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The KeysTone Statement

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Farewell, The Walking Dead: You Now Suck & Kill Way Too Many Animals

Farewell, The Walking Dead: You Now Suck & Kill Way Too Many Animals

One of the toughest pills to swallow since watching "The Walking Dead" from it's season one inception in 2010 was all of the animals that get 86'ed. It's not like I go into an episode not expecting bad shit to happen to our four-legged pals because after all, this is a zombie apocalypse show that feeds off the drama of living beings getting eaten alive. You have a pretty unrealistic take on zombies if you don't expect a deer or a cow to go down once in awhile, and I'll say, when Rick's horse got torn to pieces in that pilot season, I had to walk away from the laptop I that I was watching on, contemplating if this was an investment worth my time in.

 "Hey, uh, Morgan? Do you know this lady? She's kind of dirty."

"Hey, uh, Morgan? Do you know this lady? She's kind of dirty."

I stuck with it (I am writing this for a reason), because The Walking Dead at the time felt extremely groundbreaking. Every generation of people talk about the end of the world and this show, under Frank Darabont, depicted such a dystopian, depressed universe in such an unsettling fashion. It had good enough acting and a polished enough narrative that made you question who was going to survive and what you yourself would do in a similar situation. Many an hour I let this series run my thought process of hypotheticals whenever I was in hiking in the woods or blindly wandering around a Home Depot. Despite probably contributing to a minor seasonal affective disorder, I was hooked on the unknown and the despair.

But then you take away the decent narrative along with the drop-off of acting chops and then what do you have? One shitty television show that kills a bunch of animals.

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To be more specific, all of the characters' story arcs go in a constant loop of non-resolution. Morgan, for example (a friend of the goat pictured above), is a guy in season one who watched his wife get zombified and then we are later reunited with him in later seasons to found out that his son got nixed too. So naturally, he went nuts, going back and forth between killing people and then not killing people. He was fighting against a moral dilemma and the first time around it was a pretty fascinating yarn.

Then we saw it at least two more times with him and then reheated into other characters' story arcs. "Do we kill or don't we?" "What is this world about now?" I tell you what it's about: a half-assed hour of television writing school.  And again, they kill a lot of animals and one just recently croaked Artax style in the The Neverending Story (watch at your own risk, I almost welled up just seeing the thumbnail), which means I'm tapping out, because this show has given me nothing to hang my hat on and that future psychopath Carl still wears his dad's despite being 15 or so.

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And with the exception of Rick, Daryl & Jesus, I pretty much want everybody to die because the writers and show runners have royally screwed up everybody's character (those previous three included). Besides hearing podcasters rightfully rip this show to pieces and that I have nothing currently on live television to watch and discuss, The Walking Dead gives me no incentive to carry on. So therefore, I will follow it's ongoings only through podcasts and/or recaps.

It's sort of been a fun ride, I guess. At least the first couple seasons. Now I must find my own way to gather hopelessness from watching television.

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